Tips for Exercising and Staying Hydrated During Menopause

Tips for Exercising and Staying Hydrated During Menopause
Although regular exercise isn't a proven way to reduce symptoms such as hot flashes and sleep disturbances, it's good for us ladies to keep our activity levels up when we're going through menopause.  Having a moderate exercise routine can help us maintain a healthy weight and relieve stress, which we'll likely have plenty of during this period of time in our life.

Tip #1.  If you’re experiencing hot flushes it may be better to exercise in the morning to avoid training during the hottest part of the day.

Tip #2.  Being well hydrated before, during and after training and competition is key.  But don't just rely on plain water, especially after hot flashes and night sweats.  Adequately replacing the sodium you’ve lost in your sweat is crucial and it might also help you avoid exercise-related muscle cramps.

Tip #3.  If you're prone to night sweats, having an electrolyte drink by your bedside can help you stay on top of your losses and sipping the odd bottle throughout days where you think dehydration is a particular risk is another good idea.


I hope you enjoyed this article and found it helpful!  If you would like to speak to me directly about anything related to this post, please reach out to me here. Have a great week!

~ Jennifer

Mental Health Effects of Menopause

Mental Health Effects of Menopause
Menopause is a difficult time for us women.  It feels as if we can come under attack at any time of the day or night, and this can wear us down both physically and mentally...
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4 Primary Causes of Menopause

4 Primary Causes of Menopause
Going through menopause was a life-changing event for me!  One of the questions I wanted answered was, "Why am I going through this?"  Here are the four main reasons women go through menopause...

Natural decline of reproductive hormones. As we approach our late 30s, our ovaries start making less estrogen and progesterone — the hormones that regulate menstruation — and our fertility declines.  In our 40s, our menstrual periods may become longer or shorter, heavier or lighter, and more or less frequent, until eventually — on average, by age 51 — our ovaries stop producing eggs, and we no longer have periods.

Hysterectomy. A hysterectomy that removes your uterus but not your ovaries usually doesn't cause immediate menopause. Although you will no longer have periods, your ovaries still release eggs and produce estrogen and progesterone.  
But surgery that removes both your uterus and your ovaries (total hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy) does cause immediate menopause.  Your periods stop immediately, and you're likely to have hot flashes and other menopausal signs and symptoms, which can be severe, as these hormonal changes occur abruptly rather than over several years.


Chemotherapy and radiation therapy. These cancer therapies can induce menopause, causing symptoms such as hot flashes during or shortly after the course of treatment.  The halt to menstruation (and fertility) is not always permanent following chemotherapy.

Primary ovarian insufficiency.  About 1 percent of women experience menopause before age 40 (premature menopause).  Menopause may result from primary ovarian insufficiency — when your ovaries fail to produce normal levels of reproductive hormones — stemming from genetic factors or autoimmune disease.  But often no cause can be found. 

I hope you enjoyed this article and found it helpful!  If you would like to speak to me directly about anything related to this post, please reach out to me here.  Have a great week!

~ Jennifer

Health Risks That Increase After Menopause

Health Risks That Increase After Menopause
After menopause, your risk of certain medical conditions increases. Examples include:

Cardiovascular disease.  When your estrogen levels decline, your risk of cardiovascular disease increases.  Heart disease is the leading cause of death in women as well as in men. So it's important to get regular exercise, eat a healthy diet and maintain a normal weight. 

Osteoporosis. This condition causes bones to become brittle and weak, leading to an increased risk of fractures. During the first few years after menopause, you may lose bone density at a rapid rate, increasing your risk of osteoporosis. Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis are especially susceptible to fractures of their spine, hips and wrists.

Urinary incontinence. As the tissues of your vagina and urethra lose elasticity, you may experience frequent, sudden, strong urges to urinate, followed by an involuntary loss of urine (urge incontinence), or the loss of urine with coughing, laughing or lifting (stress incontinence).  You may also get urinary tract infections more often.


Sexual function. Vaginal dryness from decreased moisture production and loss of elasticity can cause discomfort and slight bleeding during sexual intercourse. Also, decreased sensation may reduce your desire for sexual activity (libido).

Weight gain.  Many women gain weight during the menopausal transition and after menopause because metabolism slows.  You may need to eat less and exercise more, just to maintain your current weight.

I hope you enjoyed this article and found it helpful!  If you would like to speak to me directly about anything related to this post, please reach out to me here.  Have a great week!

~ Jennifer

The 3 Most Important Things to Look For in a Home-Based Business

The 3 Most Important Things to Look For in a Home-Based Business
What a crazy time in the world with the CoronoVirus pandemic going on!  We are seeing thousands of people all over the world being laid off temporarily or permanently as companies are being hit hard by the economic changes going on...
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